Financial infidelity can destroy a marriage

Financial infidelity can destroy a marriage

| Dec 17, 2019 | Divorce |

Money and stress often go hand in hand. No matter a married couple’s annual income, finances are often the No.1 issue spouses argue over the most. Couples who have mismatched financial priorities may fight more about where their hard-earned money goes each month.

Sadly, these disagreements can lead to financial infidelity. In fact, some spouses may view this as an even bigger betrayal than sexual infidelity. According to a recent survey, 2 in 5 Americans admitted to committing financial adultery.

What spouses should be on the lookout for

While it can be hard to spot at first, identifying red flags can make it easier for couples to address the issue. These may be some warning signs:

  • They start hiding their purchases: Whether they’re shopping at the store or online, if one spouse is making excessive purchases, they may have a spending problem. This can be a significant issue if the couple doesn’t make much money.
  • They refuse to discuss financial matters: If a partner refuses to discuss anything revolving around the household budget, they may be trying to hide something. Often, people who lie about money may get emotional and defensive as well. That’s because they may be trying to hide financial information that could be detrimental to their marriage.
  • There is abnormal activity coming from shared accounts: Some spouses may contribute to a joint bank account. If one spouse notices an abnormally high credit card statement or a considerable cash withdrawal, this can be a significant red flag.

Discussing money matters is crucial

No matter a couple’s level of income, when financial infidelity becomes an issue, it should be addressed immediately. Spouses need to create a safe environment where they can talk about each of their financial needs. If financial infidelity is still an issue after countless discussions, couples may want to think about going their separate ways.

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