The adoption process is expensive and so is raising children. Many families take out loans to fulfill their dreams to provide safe and loving homes for the children they adopt. Even though families generally have the means to pay off these loans over time, any financial assistance is worth looking into. 

According to the North American Council on Adoptable Children, one option parents might look into is the South Carolina Adoption Assistance Program. This program provides subsidies to parents who are considering or already going through the steps of adoption. Not all children qualify for the subsidy, but many do, based on personal history. 

What are the qualifications?

These are some of the many qualifications children might need to meet if they will live in South Carolina. Generally, children only need to meet one or more of the criteria: 

  • Is 10 years and older for Caucasians or six years and older for African American and multi-racial children 
  • Has a psychological or physical disability or is at risk of developing disabilities due to pre-existing conditions 
  • Belongs to a group of siblings that includes one child designated as having special needs 
  • Is African American or multi-racial and belongs to a sibling group of three or more children of any age or a group of two or more where one child is six years old or older 
  • Is Caucasian and belongs to a sibling group of four or more children of any age or a group of three or more children where one child is six years old or older 

Are there other programs to consider?

Parents who adopt younger, individual children might miss out on this subsidy, but there are other programs to consider. The South Carolina Department of Social Services recommends looking into potential qualifications for Medicaid benefits. 

The state website also reminds parents that it is important to look beyond what children qualify for in specific areas. Check whether the local resources can tend to the children, especially in cases where there is a disability to account for. 

Federal and state governments put these types of assistance programs in place to encourage future adoptive parents to consider children people often overlook. Note that adoption assistance lasts until the children turn 18 or even 21.