3 reasons you might need spousal support in an upcoming divorce

3 reasons you might need spousal support in an upcoming divorce

| Jun 11, 2021 | Divorce |

Money is often a major issue in modern divorces. Spouses might divorce over financial disagreements or fight bitterly over the assets that they value the most. Sometimes, one spouse needs to ask for money from the other spouse to cover their basic living expenses both during and immediately after the divorce. 

While alimony, which some people call spousal maintenance or spousal support, can be an important tool, it isn’t always available during a divorce. If you fall into any of the three categories below, you may have grounds for asking for alimony in your South Carolina divorce.

1. If you left your career to care for the family

The household as a whole may have benefited from your unpaid labor, but leaving the workforce to care for your family can mean you have lower overall earning potential and fewer resources in your own name. Whether you stayed home to attend to the family’s needs, you may be able to ask for alimony. 

2. If your spouse divorces you for health reasons

While most marriage vows include promises to stay together through sickness and health, not everyone upholds that vow. If your spouse decides to divorce you because you have a degenerative condition or terminal illness like cancer that keeps you from working, the courts may order alimony so that you can support yourself after the divorce.

3. If parenting obligations will prevent you from working

Maybe you have multiple children still too young to go to school who require your care around the clock, effectively preventing you from taking a job outside of the home. Maybe you only have one child, but they have such severe special needs that they require constant support. That may also entitle you to alimony.

Generally, you need to have fewer assets and lower earning potential than your spouse, and they also need to have the income for assets to make them able to pay. Exploring alimony can make you feel more confident about filing for a South Carolina divorce.

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